top of page

Leadership Spotlight: Carla Griffin

Updated: Mar 12


Our latest Leadership Spotlight features Carla Griffin!


Carla’s broad experience in the digital industry has seen her work with several brands across the apparel & manufacturing industry.


Carla’s most recent position was with David Philips, as their Chief Marketing Officer. Before moving to David Philips, Carla worked with names such as Panasonic Computer Products Europe, Toshiba Information Systems (UK) Ltd, and Coats.






In our Q&A with Carla, she discusses her “mixed” career journey to date across various roles, what she loves about working in the digital industry, the challenges in a CMO role, her success completing an ERP integration project, why AI will be the leading trend in 2024 and her love for sewing.


Read the Q&A below.


Why did you join the Digital Leaders Club?


To keep up to date with where MarTech is, it’s constantly evolving and this is a great forum to hear feedback on what’s working, and what’s not – to share ideas and woes!


What's your career journey been like to date?


Pretty mixed, I started in technology at Panasonic then across to Toshiba, before moving into industrial thread & performance materials at FTSE 250 Coats Group, and then most recently furniture & furnishing services. Always in a generalist role with a wide remit, but as tech has developed I’ve found I’ve had to build my skill set in digital to best deliver in my roles. It goes to show, however that despite what some people may say, you can definitely move between industries.


What do you love about working in digital? 


You’re always learning, it never stays still and what worked one week, might have moved on to something new the following week – it keeps you on your toes, which is why networks and forums where you can share experiences are so valuable.


What are the common challenges you see in digital leadership? 


How much you’re expected to know about new tech before it’s tested or well-established. Particularly in a CMO role, I’ve noticed the grey area between a CMO and a CTO growing depending on where ownership for things like the website. Everything is test and learn and that can take some time, and time isn’t often something you have a lot of in hand!

 

 Tell us about your best success story


Getting a website re-platform and new ERP integration project over the line – it was a hell of a project, super old tech, fully embedded in the company, a disengaged tech team and minimal budgets with high expectations.


It took a lot of time and commitment to rebuild bridges between teams, unpick workflows and systems to understand what we needed to plug in, what could be reworked and what could be discarded.


As a team, we made a substantial positive difference to the company's online capabilities, visibility and customer UX. I learned a heck of a lot about not just the tech of the project but also the importance of getting everyone on board with the journey as early as you can, it’s much better to have a team that wants to do something rather than just has to.


What’s it been like transitioning to a hybrid setup over the past few years? 


Personally, I’ve really enjoyed the mix, some days when you need to be head down in a project a home day gives you that space. I think it’s important to think about how

to use a mix of office and home days to the best advantage, if you’re in the office be available, and be there to connect with people, it’s not that you can’t do that remotely, but it can be harder.


Which trend do you predict will dominate 2024? 


It does seem to be all about AI. What can it do – what can’t it do, yet? I think there is work to do both in marketing, the wider business, and in company leadership to build a better understanding of the limitations that come with using AI, yes it can write copy, but it doesn’t necessarily replace a copywriter for example.


The other thing is attribution, with so many channels and multiple touch points now part of most marketing strategies, trying to figure out how to measure and report back on effectiveness is becoming more and more difficult to do in a way that makes finance bods happy. I think it is and will continue to be an ongoing discussion.


How would your colleagues describe you? 


I’ve been told I’m approachable, I give a clear steer, and take the time to support and give my help where I can. I think they’d also say I’m a pretty calm person, we get things done, but in a way that doesn’t break us in the process!

 

What are your hobbies and interests outside of work?


I like making things, I’m a silversmith in my spare time and you’ll often find me around Hatton Garden picking up supplies. I like sewing, but I’m pretty confident I’ve found my limit with what I can pull together on that front, I’m always slightly nervous if I’m wearing something I’ve made it won’t be in one piece by the end of the day!


What's your plan for the future?


For now, it’s consulting. Having been in permanent roles up until now, I’m enjoying the flexibility and mix that comes with working across companies. It’s allowing me to share experiences between projects and broaden my own horizons. But who knows, I’m open to all opportunities where I can add value and continue to learn at the same time.


What would you be doing (for a career) if you weren’t doing this?


Something in a creative field, I’m a storyteller at heart and whatever I am doing has an element of that to it. So perhaps I’d be finding a way to tell stories through handmade objects.

 

Connect with Carla on LinkedIn



Recent Posts

See All

Comments


bottom of page